Tagged: Kingston University

London Rivers Week: Hogsmill River restoration

Building on the success of last year, London Rivers Week, 26th June to 2nd July, 2017 aimed to encourage Londoners to take pride in the city’s waterways, understand the challenges they face and come together to create a healthy future for our rivers.

During the week City Hall held a conference entitled “Why Restore Rivers?” where developers had the opportunity to listen to the benefits of including river restorations. A brief document called How River Restorations Enhance Developments in London, outlining some of the benefits of such work, is now available.

London Rivers Week showcases some of these newly restored natural spaces and raises awareness about how they are vital for Londoners’ wellbeing. Environmental organisations including the Zoological Society of London, London Wildlife Trust, the Environment Agency, Thames Estuary Partnership and the South East Rivers Trust have all joined forces with Thames21 and are putting on free events during the week.

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Click on the map to read about 23 projects where you can visit to escape the city and get beside rewilded rivers, including 2 projects close to Kingston University. The Hogsmill River runs directly past the Kingston School of Art Faculty and the university’s Sustainability Hub the Biodiversity Action Group has worked with The South East Rivers Trust, constructing a natural riverbank to increase habitat provision and improve its appearance. Over three phases, timber deflectors were introduced, brash and gravel added to the river and then planted. Read more here: Hogsmill River transformed into wetland and Hogsmill River transformed into wetland – revisited

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Postgraduate Landscape Course Taster Event

Kingston University, London is running a Postgraduate Landscape Architecture event on Thursday 9th June, 2016. Booking is essential to attend this event. Register your attendance by email

Time: 6.00pm – 8.00pm
Venue: Reception, Knights Park campus, Grange Road, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey KT1 2QJ
Price: free

For further information about this event:

Contact: Carine Brannan
Email: C.Brannan@kingston.ac.uk

 

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The following Landscape courses are offered at Kingston University:

Students and staff will be available to meet and discuss course options. The event takes place at The Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Knights Park, Kingston during the Faculty’s Annual Graduation Show which runs from Saturday 4 June 2016 – Friday 10 June 2016.  There will be an opportunity to view and discuss final project work from this year’s graduating Landscape Architecture PgDip (LI Accredited) cohort.

New postgraduate loans – Funding available to support postgraduate study

If you are starting a course from September 2016, you will be able to apply for a loan of up to £10,000 to study for a postgraduate masters degree. Taught and research-based courses are eligible and funding is available for both full-time and part-time study.

The postgraduate loan will be paid directly to you and will be non-means tested. It can be used towards the fees for your course or you can choose to spend it on living costs.

The loans have been introduced to help people advance their careers and to gain skills to support innovation and growth in the UK.

//2161076.fls.doubleclick.net/activityi;src=2161076;type=discking;cat=dk0000cv;u1=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.kingston.ac.uk%2Fpostgraduate%2Ffees-and-funding%2Ffunding-your-course%2Fpostgraduate-loans%2F;u2=New%20postgraduate%20loans%20-%20Funding%20your%20course%20-%20Fees%20and%20funding%20-%20Postgraduate%20study%20-%20Kingston%20University%20London;ord=7167131885143;~oref=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.kingston.ac.uk%2Fpostgraduate%2Ffees-and-funding%2Ffunding-your-course%2Fpostgraduate-loans%2F?Eligibility

  • UK and EU students resident in England and aged under 60 years old are eligible to apply for loans.
  • Loans of up to £10,000 are available but there is no minimum loan request amount.
  • Loans are available for full- and part-time taught and research courses in any subject.
  • Masters courses are eligible for this loan but not postgraduate certificates (PgCerts), postgraduate diplomas (PgDips) or PhD courses.
  • Loans will be managed by the Student Loans Company.

 

 

Kingston University postgraduate loans

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Click here to book Postgraduate Drop-in Evening

Funding available to support postgraduate study

If you are starting a course from September 2016, you will be able to apply for a loan of up to £10,000 to study for a postgraduate masters degree. Taught and research-based courses are eligible and funding is available for both full-time and part-time study.

The postgraduate loan will be paid directly to you and will be non-means tested. It can be used towards the fees for your course or you can choose to spend it on living costs.

The loans have been introduced to help people advance their careers and to gain skills to support innovation and growth in the UK.

Eligibility

  • UK and EU students resident in England and aged under 60 years old are eligible to apply for loans.
  • Loans of up to £10,000 are available but there is no minimum loan request amount.
  • Loans are available for full- and part-time taught and research courses in any subject.
  • MA courses are eligible for this loan but not postgraduate certificates (PgCerts), postgraduate diplomas (PgDips) or PhD courses.
  • Loans will be managed by the Student Loans Company.

Further information

For further information or if you have have queries about financial support for postgraduate students, please email studentfunding@kingston.ac.uk.

 

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Latin American Roundtable – Urbanization +

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Contact: c.lueder@kingston.ac.uk

 

Download full details of collaborators, presentations and website links

Participants:

Carlos Alberto Arriaga Jimenez, ‘Urbotic’―a new tool for urban mobility management and disaster mitigation applied to Villahermosa, Tabasco, District V, Mexico

The development of cities and their current conditions are products of an accelerating metropolization process. The urbanization that has occurred over the second half of the twentieth century is changing the scale and population of the cities in unprecedented ways, challenging the ways in which we inhabit cities. In particular mobility becomes an acute concern; as housing production grows and cities expand, while socio-economic activities remain concentrated inside the city, forcing citizens to become commuters, thereby consume their resources, time and effort. The origins of Villahermosa date back to more than 100 years ago. At this time Villahermosa’s location followed certain rationales, such as the use of natural resources, or watersheds as a means of communication and exchange of materials with other communities Climate change and weather phenomena such as floods have turned these rationales into vulnerabilities.
In this situation, mobility becomes crucial to the recovery of the city. We need to find or develop systems that are able to limit effects, or, better even, open up new alternatives. The application of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to planning, design and urban development provides a tool for the recovery of urban spaces. The use of information technologies leverages existing resources of a city such as infrastructure and urban equipment. The set of services and facilities that are generated with Urbótics systems enhance urban living; by providing mobility, welfare, security, and communications, they contribute to an efficient, sustainable and liveable city.

Dr. Helena Riviera
‘Medellín Urban Innovation’―Edinburgh College of Art research project, Colombia

 

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After decades of internal conflict, Colombia is experiencing a period of rapid economic growth and urbanisation. It remains, however, one of the most socially unequal countries in Latin America. Medellin has pioneered innovative forms of city planning and management and was acclaimed the most innovative city in the world. Hosting the World Urban Forum in 2014 allowed it to showcase its approach, key elements of which have been: creation of innovative transport infrastructure linking poorer peripheral districts to the city centre; culture-led regeneration; strong support of local development from the local business sector; and a successful municipally-owned utilities company.
However, an initial study of the implementation of this planning approach undertaken by Edinburgh and Heriot-Watt Universities with Universidad Santo Tomas shows that: the city is spreading outwards without services and employment being provided; new low-income developments are replicating high-rise models which failed worldwide; there is limited intervention in the existing informal areas, many being in highly vulnerable locations where the level of risk is likely to increase with climate change; development has little regard for topography and ecological considerations; investment in accessible and good quality public space is restricted to some areas; the quality of the public realm does not always support health and wellbeing of the ageing population.
This institutional links collaboration will identify means to make Medellin a more socially equitable and environmentally sustainable city, through two interlinked components:

  1. A research programme focusing on developing expertise in: (a) local heritage and culture; (b) public realm, green infrastructure and wellbeing; (c) housing; and (d) mobility and socio-economic integration. 
  2. A knowledge exchange and training programme open to Colombian practitioners, policy makers and students based on the themes above.

Armando Caroca
‘The Idle Works’―Flood Mitigation Infrastructure for Public Use in Copiapó, Chile

Caroca Copiapo

Between 23 and 25 March 2015, the city of Copiapó – located in northern Chile and characterized by a semi-arid climate, with almost no annual rainfall – suffered the biggest flood of the last eighty years, which caused serious damage to urban areas and showed the vulnerability of the city when dealing with such phenomena. It also revealed that the current urban design does not sufficiently consider the geographic and climate features of the territory in which it is settled.
To reconstruct this city and other areas affected by the floods in northern Chile, the government will invest US$1,500 million in the years to come. A significant part of it will be used in the construction of hydraulic engineering works (retention basins, dams, retaining walls, energy dissipaters, slope modifications, cutwaters, rainwater sewers, etc.), in order to mitigate future natural disasters.
These mitigation works may represent the biggest public investment to date in a relatively small town like Copiapó. However, given the scarce occurrence of significant rainfall, these works will remain idle 99% of the time, with the consequent risk of being degraded or used in a way that compromises its functionality.
This research aims to open up the debate about the potential of these infrastructures if we think them as urban facilities, which might improve the life quality of city inhabitants, while increasing the social return on investment. Furthermore, these works could guide or provide a threshold for the city growth, while allowing for a safe and controlled development.
Thus, this research will propose ways to widen the scope from which architecture addresses such phenomena, by promoting a synthesis of engineering, landscaping and architectural design. This synthesis is essential for a place like northern Chile, which defines itself on the basis of its relationship with water, either by excess or deficit.

Rodrigo García González
‘Design through Magic’―Personal Experiences with Production, Transformation and Vanishing Acts

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In 2008 thanks to a Maghalaes scholarship Rodrigo spent one year at the University Catolica de Santiago de Chile developing projects in collaboration with the NGO Un Techo Para Chile. There, Rodrigo realised that Architects and Designers have the ability to change lives by transforming one space into another, or raw materials into a useful product; making problems disappear or producing something valuable from apparently nothing.
A hypothesis has informed his work since: Magicians, Architects & Designers have the power to make possible the impossible. Convert fiction into reality. The three disciplines, Magic, Architecture and Design, share objectives, tools and effects. The architectural and design projects that Rodrigo has since developed are associated with Magic effects.
Production: Something comes into view without any apparent clue as to the source. ZipZip is a deployable system that allows tall buildings to be unfolded. Its advantages are the speed of assembly and dismantlement, and of allowing the same building to be reused in different contexts. In already consolidated urban centres faced with a one-time demand, such as the Rio Olympic Games, ZipZip enables temporary increase of density. Furthermore, renting or exchanging infrastructures will “mobilize” the current real estate market.
Transformation: The magician transforms something from one state into another—a lady turns into a tiger. Devebere, an open architectural experiment and participatory constructive system, uses as its only materials plastic bottles and air… or rather, the lack thereof. The end result is a three dimensional, irregular, malleable shape. The system can be adapted to different scales and contexts.
Vanish: The magician makes something disappear, coin or Elephant. The challenge here is to make disappear the water plastic bottles that nowadays invade our daily lives. Ooho! is a project where water bottles can be eaten after consumption. Ooho! encircles water in an edible membrane of algae. The final package is simple, cheap, resistant, hygienic, and biodegradable.

Diego Ferrari,  ‘Urban Habitat II’―BERLIN 2013

urban

OKK gallery presents new photography and video documenting the work and music of Kingz of Kiez, a group of up-and-coming young rappers in Berlin. The iconographic and the everyday collide in the work of London-based fine art photographer Diego Ferrari. For this project Ferrari worked closely with these young people, taking them to iconic public places in Berlin. Together they develop a new expression, which challenges the usual clichés of rapper imagery and, by extension, migration, urban youth and disaffection. Through a playful and questioning approach, these images and video work compel the audience to rethink concepts of the inclusive multicultural city.In partnership with: Puk a Malta – Kingz of Kiez, OKK Gallery Raum 29 and Kiez Kultur Netz – Berlin 2013

Dr. Patricia Lara-Betancourt,  ‘European or National? Latin American Domestic Interiors and the Quest for Modernity, 1870-1930’

Lara-Betancourt Enrique Meiggs Residence Santiago Chile c1860

Latin America went through a crucial and transformative period in its history from the 1870s to 1930 when an economic boom gripped the region unleashing radical urban and housing transformations modelled on European cities and culture. In the last three decades of the nineteenth century the region’s export economy finally took off securing also longed-for political stability allowing the new nations to embark on a much needed modernisation process including urban and population growth, the expansion of its bourgeois and middle class reflected in domestic architecture, and novel social behaviour and consumption practices. At the turn of the century the Latin American Belle Époque rivalled the ones in Europe in terms of wealth, domestic architecture and fashionable furniture and furnishings. Surprisingly, while urban transformations have been widely researched and documented, the significant changes of the related Latin America’s domestic material culture in this period has been little studied.
This paper will discuss the changes in domestic architecture and interiors that the upper-class and expanding middle-class implemented not only as a result of new wealth but also in response to a deep-seated desire to engage with modernity and to become and be seen as civilized and modern. With a comparative perspective the article will show how the traditional colonial architectural language was abandoned in new residences while embracing modern trends in domestic architecture being developed in Europe, mainly in France, Britain and Italy. While bearing in mind significant differences between countries, an important aim will be to highlight what was distinctively Latin American in the way the region experienced and tried to appropriate Modernity within a context of globalized trade and industrial development, and to explain the significance of such changes to the emergence and consolidation of class and national identities in a time of transition.

Christoph Lueder, Alexandru Malaescu, Iulia Fratila
‘Atlas of Negotiated Typologies’―Collaborative Field Research at Cerro de la Cruz, Valparaiso, Chile

Lueder Malaescu Fratila Cerro de la Cruz matrix

In a series of collaborations with resident academic and community partners we have documented four communities, each exemplary for a particular model and context of development, located in Jordan, Thailand, India and Chile. Our most recent episode of field research has been undertaken on Cerro de la Cruz, a neighbourhood in the hills overlooking Valparaiso, which forms a complex, three-dimensional assemblage of homes whose positions and forms derive from continual negotiations between neighbours, respond to topography, and consider exposure to sunlight and views.
Drawing on interviews, urban and building surveys gathered from these case studies, we examine how processes that draw on feedback from the actions and experience of construction and inhabitation register in urban and built form, as opposed to forms stipulated by supervisory regulation and formal composition. We will discuss two themes and scales, exemplifying the responsive and the memetic dimensions of the kinetic city: First, iterative negotiation between urban structure and topography, and the aspects in which this negotiation contrasts against established paradigms of urban design and regulatory protocols. Second, the recuperation, adaption and fragmentation of inherited or remembered spatial typologies, read through a distinction between Colin Rowe’s paradigm of “ideal types,” as opposed to evolutionary metaphors and genetic codes.

Carlos Alberto Arriaga Jimenez
Urbotic―a new tool for urban mobility management and disaster mitigation applied to Villahermosa, Tabasco, District V, Mexico

mexico

The development of cities and their current conditions are products of an accelerating metropolization process. The urbanization that has occurred over the second half of the twentieth century is changing the scale and population of the cities in unprecedented ways, challenging the ways in which we inhabit cities. In particular mobility becomes an acute concern; as housing production grows and cities expand, while socio-economic activities remain concentrated inside the city, forcing citizens to become commuters, thereby consume their resources, time and effort. The origins of Villahermosa date back to more than 100 years ago. At this time Villahermosa’s location followed certain rationales, such as the use of natural resources, or watersheds as a means of communication and exchange of materials with other communities Climate change and weather phenomena such as floods have turned these rationales into vulnerabilities.
In this situation, mobility becomes crucial to the recovery of the city. We need to find or develop systems that are able to limit effects, or, better even, open up new alternatives. The application of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to planning, design and urban development provides a tool for the recovery of urban spaces. The use of information technologies leverages existing resources of a city such as infrastructure and urban equipment. The set of services and facilities that are generated with Urbótics systems enhance urban living; by providing mobility, welfare, security, and communications, they contribute to an efficient, sustainable and liveable city.

Is the planning system threatening the protected landscape of Arcadian Thames?

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“Has the tide gone out for the protection of this historic landscape?” asks Campaign for the Protection of Rural England in their latest report, The Arcadian Thames: planning policy ignored?, which was launched at the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture, Kingston University yesterday.

The report argues that weakening of the planning system is putting the protected landscape of the Arcadian Thames under threat. The Arcadian Thames is the name used for the stretch of Thames between Weybridge and Kew, a historic landscape enjoyed by Londoners for hundreds of years as a result of the efforts of the campaigners at the beginning of the 20th century.

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Download PDF: Arcadian_Thames_report_FINAL_low_res.pdf

Since the successful campaign in 1902 to protect the ‘View from Richmond Hill’, the haven of green space along the Thames from Weybridge to Hampton to Kew has been conserved and protected. Also known as ‘London’s Countryside’, this extraordinarily diverse landscape collectively contains more listed buildings, conservation areas, wildlife sites and registered parks and gardens than in any other comparable location in the UK.

A number of planning decisions across the Arcadian Thames London boroughs – Kingston, Hounslow, and Richmond – both ongoing and completed, are discussed in the CPRE’s report to illustrate how various planning frameworks are enforced to allow or refuse new developments. Large-scale plans in Kingston town centre and Brentford reveal a number of issues and attitudes regarding views and vistas along this special landscape.

Le Havre: city_port_forest_beach

MA Landscape + Urbanism, Kingston University – Student profile

I am Fabio Porcu and I graduated with a Masters in Building Engineering and Architecture in Italy in 2013. Having finished my master I decided to continue my studies, but working in a different scale. My previous experience has mostly been focused on the “building” scale but I haven’t explored the design process at ‘local’ or ‘city’ scale or the effect urban design has on communities and lifestyle.

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The MA Landscape + Urbanism course at Kingston University, London offered me the opportunity to think about how to work in larger urban scales and how to understand the relationship and context of urban designs and their surroundings.  The description of the course looked like the perfect combination between the theoretical part I needed to improve, whilst offering me the opportunity of practical work on live projects thus allowing me to test my new knowledge and skills which I learned during the course.

The course itself has been full of opportunities: meeting professionals in the field of Landscape Architecture has helped to reveal how different people work on similar problems; tutorials in studio with professional Landscape Architects were crucial to examining my project experiences, improving my capacity to explain my ideas and understanding and for tutors to suggest the best way to translate my concepts from the abstract to the physical.

One of the most important features at Kingston University is, without doubt, the amazing quantity and quality of facilities and workshops dedicated to the creation of models, prints and multi-media products.  Everything you could need to help communicate and express your work is available – with no limits on imagination!  Workshops have every kind of material and machine to realize your ideas, but the most valuable factor are the technicians, always very friendly and available to support you in the creative process.

I moved from Corsica, in the centre of the Mediterranean, to the biggest city in Europe to study at Kingston University. That was a difficult choice in my life – London can be a challenging and daunting place!  At the same time, it is a great city to expand your thinking and broaden your horizons. The multi-ethnic composition of the city, the huge number of architecture and landscape architecture projects plus every kind of art event and the opportunity to meet people from all parts of the world helps to create a very stimulating learning environment.   Kingston University’s Masters in Landscape and Urbanism has supported and encouraged me to expand my ideas and concepts with the amazing opportunity to try these on live and theoretical projects throughout the course.

Once I have completed the MA Landscape + Urbanism I will look for a work in the Landscape field.  I am planning to stay in England, possibly in London. Here in London I can find the right environment to improve my knowledge about Landscape architecture and afterwards I would like to have the opportunity to return to Italy bringing with me the skills acquired studying and working in London. Having studied engineering and architecture before I hope to be able to mix my previous knowledge with the new skills gained during this course and work in a Landscape design studio.

The following is an extract from a recent project Fabio has been working on – a proposal for Le Havre in Norther France.

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Proposal section

“A new threshold for Le Havre as a linking point between the UNESCO site, the impressionist gallery and the port authority.  The project reconnects the city and the port and the city and the sea. Extending the grid of the city and projecting the main axes of communication on the Quai de Southampton, the project stitches the urban fabric with the waterfront. The evolution of the waterfront continues.  New layers of connection allow new relationships with the port for citizens and visitors to Le Havre.  The area, given back from the port authority to the city will host social activities and public events. It offers space for habitat creation celebrating the coast of Normandy and the particular character of the Seine Estuary.”

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Diagrams of study

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Axonometric diagram